News and Blog

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Posted 4/12/2015 12:25pm by Eleanor Kane.

Hi Folks,  

We hope everyone had a great winter! We were certainly glad for the break, but now that the sun is higher in the sky and the days are warming up, we’re ready to put the snow behind us and see the grass grow!  

New seasons always bring new changes to a farm, and we’re excited about a lot that’s going on here: it’ll be our first time growing in the hoop house we built last fall, we’re planting apple trees and blueberry bushes, and we’ve welcomed a bigger staff for 2015, so that while we still have patches of snow and cold nights, the farm feels like we’re really starting to ramp up for the year.  

As we do so, we have a few announcements. It’s been a long transition to feeling settled into the farm, and now that we’ve been here for almost two years we’re feeling far like more like part of the community. We always knew that part of taking over the Warren Farm would mean some changes as we steward this land into its future as a farm, and part of that has been bringing livestock back to the fields, clearing more pasture, and expanding the vegetable operation. The other part is that we’ve always been planning to officially change the name and this summer we’re going to take the next steps of doing just that by replacing the sign at the end of the road and beginning to shut down this website.  

From now on, you’ll receive emails from Brasen Hill Farm and you can find up to date information at www.brasenhillfarm.com as well as on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/brasenhillfarm. We don’t have this same blog on the front page of our other website so make sure that you’re subscribed to our mailing list if you want to know what’s happening each week during the growing season.   As many of you know, we have our vegetable CSA sign-ups open, which you can access through our other webpage, and soon we’ll have pre-orders available for whole and half pigs, and whole lambs and goats so look out for upcoming newsletters!   

Luckily, even though the name of the farm might be changing, nothing else is.  We’re looking forward to the asparagus coming up in just a few weeks, and then the first spring lettuces, peas, and radishes.  We’ll be open on Wednesdays and Thursdays 11:30-3:30pm and Saturdays 12pm-3pm from June through October, and then we’ll be open daily for Christmas trees starting the weekend before Thanksgiving, the same as always.  

Thank you all for your support, warmth, and kindness as we’ve moved into your neighborhood and the Warren’s farm. It’s been a great almost-two years and we’re very much looking forward to our future here!

-Eleanor and Theo

 

Posted 11/21/2014 1:38pm by Eleanor Kane.

Christmas Trees and Wreaths

We’ll be open every day from Saturday, November 22nd through December 23rd (except for Thanksgiving) from 9am to dusk for cut your own Christmas Trees and homemade wreaths! We also have a couple pre-cut Christmas Trees available, for those of you who don’t want to make the trip out to the fields.  

All cut your own trees are $45 dollars, no matter what size they are.  

Hay Rides

We’ll have hay rides available all day on Saturdays and from 11am – dusk on Sundays.  If you want a hay ride the other days of the week, give us a call at 868 2001 or an email at farmers@brasenhillfarm.com to make sure that someone who can drive the tractor will be around the farm.  

Things to Know 

  • Always check the weather before heading out to the farm as it can be very windy and cold.
  • Dogs are allowed but must be kept leashed at all times.
  •  We provide hand saws or you are welcome to bring your own.  Chainsaws are not allowed.  
  • After you have cut down your tree, we will pull the tree through the netter which makes it easier to get into the house.  We also have twine available to tie your tree to your car, and we can assist you with that process if you need help.  

Vegetables

We still have some veggies for sale! We have potatoes, onions, and kale, so if you’re in the mood to stock up on any of those, please swing by!  

Eggs

Thanks to everyone who’s stopped by to get self-service eggs over the last month!  We’ll continue to have eggs for sale while we’re open for Christmas Trees, and then we’ll go back to self-service after December 23rd.  

Meat

We have chicken, lamb, pork, goat and beef in stock. We’re getting an entire cow in on December 9th, so let us know if you have any interest in buying an 1/8th or a ¼ of a cow, and receiving a bulk discount!  

Other Products Currently in Stock 

  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH  

Looking Towards 2015

We will be looking to staff two positions for the 2015 growing season.  First, we’re looking for an Assistant Grower to help with our Vegetable CSA. Secondly, we’re looking for a more generalized farm hand who is willing to work with animals, in the vegetable fields, cutting cordwood, and on some carpentry projects. Both positions would be available as soon as March and would continue through December, with an option for work over the winter of 2016, and then that 2016 growing season as well. Experience is not required, but would be preferred. We’ll post a more thorough job description soon, but for know if you or anyone you know might be interested, please give us a call at 603-868-2001, or send an email to us at farmers@brasenhillfarm.com  

2015 Vegetable CSA

We still have plenty of spots available in our CSA for next year!  We know that June feels really far away, but getting folks signed up this time of year helps us start to plan our crops and order seeds, which we do in the beginning of January. If you have any questions about the CSA, you can find out more by clicking here, or stop by the store to ask us about it in person.   

Posted 10/21/2014 7:36pm by Eleanor Kane.

This is our last week of the CSA, and therefore our normal store hours for the season.  And what a season it’s been!  When we moved here last year, we had a couple crops that Randy was kind enough to plant for us earlier in the summer, and we threw down some carrot, beet, and kale seeds, but other than that we didn’t have a ton of vegetables.  We certainly got our fill over the last few months!  We had a great time this year learning about the land, finding out what grows well and what doesn’t, and getting to know everyone who stopped by to pick up some fresh produce, meat, and eggs.  

As we move into fall and winter, we’re running out of the variety we had up until now.  We still have plenty for this coming week, but after Saturday we’ll close up shop until we open for Christmas Trees, starting November 22nd.  That weekend and through Thanksgiving we’ll have a big bulk sale of the very last of our onions and potatoes, as well as any other crops that aren’t sold in the next few days.  If you want to stock up on veggies for a holiday meal, that’s a great last chance for some farm produce!  

But even though we won’t have the store open between Saturday and later in November, that doesn’t mean our hens will stop laying!  They’re slowing down for the winter, but we’re still getting a couple dozen eggs every day.  We’ll keep the store open for self-service eggs, based on the honor system.  Come on in anytime, grab a dozen from the fridge, and leave $5 per dozen in cash or a check (made out to Brasen Hill Farm) in the mason jar on the counter.  If there’s already change in it, feel free to break a ten or a twenty, but it’s probably a good idea to come with small bills.  And – the most difficult part of your egg purchase –ignore whatever big brown eyes the dogs turn on you.  If they’re out, leave them out, and if they’re in, leave them in.   

We’ll be in touch later in the fall with details about Christmas Trees, as well as the exciting news that we’re buying some beef again, all 100% grassfed, which we’ll have for sale along with our lamb, goat, pork, and chicken.  We’ve been out of steaks for a while now, but as of mid December, they’ll be back in stock!  We’ll also send out a couple reminders about CSA sign ups for 2015 – it’s a great way to have fresh food in the house for the spring, summer, and fall and we’re looking forward to June already!!  

For now, we’ll just say thank you for a wonderful season!  We hope to see many of you this week for some delicious fall veggies, and if not then, then later for the holidays.  These last few months have been exactly what we hoped for when we bought this farm last summer, and so much of that was having customers come every week to enjoy what we grew.  We couldn’t do it without you all!

 

This Week's Vegetables:

  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Brussell Sprouts
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Acorn Squash
  • Butternut Squash
  • Delicata Squash
  • Pumpkins
  • Potatoes 
  • Garlic 
  • Chard
  • Swiss Chard
  • Kale
  • Cabbage

Also Available:

  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH 

 

Posted 10/14/2014 7:04pm by Eleanor Kane.

All summer long I look forward to the sun setting since it means that we can go inside and be done for the day… except for those days we get out headlamps, turn on headlights, and keep working well past dark.   These days, I’m rather wishing for the late evening sun of June and August – getting the farm ready for winter is an enormous project, and one which I underestimate every single year.  It’s all small stuff that seems like it should be easy, such as moving the pigs up to the barnyard before the first snowfall. Just go get the pigs, right? But first we have to set up a new area for them, since we have our boar now, and we need to keep the ladies separate until we’re ready to breed them.  That means picking up cattle panels and T-posts from Agway, clearing brush with the chainsaw to beat back the woods where we want their enclosure to be. Then, there’s the couple pieces of farm equipment that are sitting in the way, and it’s a seemingly simple project to move them, until we actually start doing so.  Hours (or days) later, when we finally have their new fence set up, we need to figure out their water situation for the winter, what’ll be sturdy enough for three sows, what our system to keep it unfrozen will be, and when that’s done, we need to build a shelter for them which, you guessed it, means another trip to Agway.  Then we might just be ready to go get them, which will involve hooking up the trailer, driving it out to the back pasture where they’ve spent the summer, and loading them up.   

Each and every time we do this, I think to myself, ok, we’ll just get them on the trailer, drive them back, unload them and be done for the day.  Of course, the optimal phrase there being ‘just’.  Loading pigs generally goes a couple ways.  The special, perfect, karma-filled days are those when they saunter up onto the trailer like they’ve been waiting for us to show up.  What happens most of the time, though, is that they stand six inches from the ramp and refuse to budge.  No amount of coaxing, luring, and convincing with delicious grain and cracked corn will get them to move and we’re reduced to waiting to see if, and when, they decide to go on.  It’s always a roll of the dice as to what’ll happen and I generally go into those days with my fingers crossed.    

Farming is often like figuring out a giant jigsaw puzzle: we can’t get the pig area set up until we have the materials, and we can’t go get the supplies right now because there’s hay in the truck, and the reason the hay’s in the truck is because we haven’t unloaded it yet, and the reason we haven’t unloaded it is that everyone’s out planting garlic, and the reason we’re planting garlic today is that it’s going to rain on Thursday and we want to get it in the ground before that, and we didn’t plant it last week because we needed to get the field disced and why didn’t we disc the field ten days ago?  Because we had the brush hog on the tractor and were mowing the Christmas tree fields, which we still haven’t finished because we’re getting ready to work on the pig area, and all of this needs to happen now, so that we can get the broilers and turkeys processed, the chicken coop set up for winter – and don’t forget about that storm coming, let’s make sure we’re ready for that, someone remember to throw a tarp over the firewood.  

It’s like this all year round, which keeps our job fun and interesting… and means that when it starts getting dark earlier this time of year it’s slightly frustrating to have our work days curtailed. It’s also a welcome treat to put down our tools, toss the pigs some grain out in the field, and tell them we’ll be back for them tomorrow.  Assuming we get that hay unloaded.    

Please note that we will be closed on Saturday!  

 

This Week's Vegetables:

  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Brussell Sprouts
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Acorn Squash
  • Butternut Squash
  • Delicata Squash
  • Pumpkins
  • Potatoes 
  • Garlic 
  • Chard
  • Swiss Chard
  • Kale
  • Cabbage

Also Available:

  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH 
Posted 10/7/2014 7:36pm by Eleanor Kane.

Let’s talk about autumn.  And garlic.  They are two of our favorite things on the farm: it’s not as hot anymore, there’s fewer bugs, and the days are growing shorter, so that we might be busy as ever, but we’re starting to have our workdays constrained by daylight and this time of year we’re pretty ok with having to stop earlier than we used to, and start later.  Fall is a time for wrapping things up – and, despite the fact that on this farm we’re getting ready for Christmas, our vegetables are pretty much done for the year.  We have a couple weeks left of the CSA – and so that everyone knows, we’ll be closing on Saturday, October 25th until we open up again November 22nd for Christmas Trees (self service eggs will be available and I'll talk about that in the next newsletter) – but even having some veggies left meant that we still spent the weekend mowing the last of the summer crops and getting the fields all ready for winter.   

And garlic.  Is there anything better?  Maybe – I love brussels sprouts and Theo loves delicata squash (can you guess what we’ve been eating non-stop for the last couple weeks?), but garlic goes with just about everything and I don’t think a meal goes by when we don’t cook without it.  

What the heck do these two things have to do with each other?  In getting ready for winter, we have one last task that makes it feel a bit like spring again: planting garlic.  

There’s something about being out in the dirt this time of year when your hands are cold, it’s overcast more often than not, and you’re thinking of a hot cup of tea that reminds me of doing the same in May, when we’re setting out our first lettuce transplants.  But this time, instead of spring greens, October brings us a chance to get the garlic in the ground so that it can establish its roots before it goes dormant for the winter.  It’s a funny thing to be doing when the leaves are bright red and orange instead of bright green and the grass is dying instead of growing.  Discing up the field, getting the rototiller back out, shaping beds, and finding our trowels feels like spring activities, not what we should be doing in the middle of fall.  

But it’s also one of the best projects of the year.  Planting garlic now means that it’ll be one of the first crops up in the spring, and long before most other crops are ready we’ll be cooking with green garlic and garlic scapes, two of our other favorite foods on the farm.  Spring seems ages away, and frankly I’m looking forward to Halloween, Thanksgiving, the holidays, and some cross country skiing before we get there.  But planting garlic reminds me that it’s coming, and tucking cool dirt around those cloves is the first step to a bright green plant poking out of the ground in April.

 

This Week's Vegetables:

  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Brussell Sprouts
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Acorn Squash
  • Butternut Squash
  • Delicata Squash
  • Pumpkins
  • Broccoli
  • Potatoes 
  • Garlic 
  • Chard
  • Swiss Chard
  • Kale
  • Cabbage
Also Available:
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH 
Posted 9/30/2014 9:37am by Eleanor Kane.

We have two big pieces of news this week.  First, we are officially changing the name of the farm at the end of this year!  

While many of you know this farm as Warren Farm, we’ve been in the slow process of changing it over to be known as Brasen Hill Farm.  We didn’t want to make this switch too abrupt, since so many of you were close to the Warrens, and are used to the website and farm name for so many years now.  However, at the tail end of our first full season on the farm, we’re excited to take more concrete steps towards the transition.  As such, at the end of the year we’ll discontinue using the Warren Farm name, and when you receive the newsletter, it will come from Brasen Hill Farm.  This also means that all sign ups for next years CSA will be done through the Brasen Hil Farm website (www.brasenhillfarm.com).  That’s about all the changes that are really happening: as you all know, we’re still doing Christmas trees, hosting bird walks, and growing fruits and vegetables, with the additions of the CSA and our livestock.  We’ve been so incredibly amazed by the welcome all of you have given us and we thank you so much for accepting us as new farmers in your community!  

The second big piece of news this week is that CSA signs ups for 2015 are open!  

We had such a great time with the CSA this year, as well as everyone else who came for vegetables and fruit.  We’ll still have the normal retail sales available, exactly as we did this year, and we’re excited to allow folks to start signing up for their shares for next year.  There will be some changes, such we’re adding a pick up on Thursdays, and we’re adding a smaller share size for individuals or families who have their own vegetable garden.  And, our most exciting news, we’re instituting a sliding scale for payments so that our shares are accessible to more families in our community.  

Other big news about the CSA?  We want to add some variety to the shares for next year in the form of herbs and more interesting vegetables like tomatillos, celeriac, turnips, kohlrabi, fennel, and who even knows what else.   Maybe some edamame?  Maybe we’ll try our hands at sweet potatoes?  If you have suggestions of favorite veggies you’d love us to grow, let us know!    If you’re interested in purchasing a CSA share, please visit our website here, or come by the store.

 

This Week's Vegetables:

Onions
Leeks
Brussell Sprouts
Beets
Carrots
Acorn Squash
Butternut Squash
Broccoli
Potatoes 
Garlic 
Lettuce
Chard
Swiss Chard
Kale
Cabbage

 

Also Available:

  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH 
Posted 9/23/2014 10:22am by Eleanor Kane.

It seems like the year on the farm has distinct phases, not just because of the weather or the cycle of crops, but also the way in which we work.  Spring and fall are exciting and exhausting and interesting because they’re times of transition: we’re planning, scheduling, making decisions, wondering if we should do this or that.  Winter and summer are times to just put your head down and work: get paperwork in order, get things organized, get the taxes done, the seeds ordered, and then the summer flurry of weeding, planting, watering, and harvesting.  That means that the time that takes the most mental, if not physical energy, are these weeks before the ground freezes in the fall and the weeks in the spring when the ground has just thawed out again.
 
We’re juggling a lot of balls right now: how long can we keep the squashes in the greenhouse before we need to bring them inside as the nights get cooler?  How long will the cabbages last in the fields before splitting?  Are we going to get the boar’s winter pen ready before we get the barn set up for the sheep and goats or after? Are we going to have time to get some mulch down on the asparagus or should we spend the afternoon getting the field plowed to plant the garlic?  This was the same exact game that we played in the spring when the questions revolved around whether to weed the onions or transplant the tomatoes.  We only have so many hours, so which should we do?
 
Of course, it all tends to work out in the end, and even those things that don’t seem to and make us wish for a couple more hours of daylight, or if only the tractor hadn’t broken, eventually shake themselves out.  What would be helpful, though, would be if the weatherman could give me a 100% certain forecast for now through Christmas so that I know when, exactly, equipment will start freezing to the ground so I can move it before then, and what specific day we should set aside other work in order to get the hoses winterized.  It’d also be great if the deer would let me know which night it will be that they’ll choose to come and eat the tops off all of our beets, so we can get them harvested that afternoon, and when the first hard frost will be that will kill off the grass in the fields so that we can make sure we’ve ordered a supply of hay.
 
Barring all of that, we’ll do what we do every spring and fall: make list after list, try to fit all of Tuesday’s work in Tuesday, since we don’t have time to let it spill into Wednesday, and refresh the weather forecast every time we walk past the computer.  We’ll do as best we can with the enormous number of tasks ahead of us as we get ready for winter, with the certainty that as soon as that first thick blanket of snow falls, or as soon as it’s dark at 4 pm and too cold to comfortably work outside for more than a few hours at a time, we’ll have to put our hands up, step back from our projects, and take them up again in the spring, after a long rest.

 

This Week's Vegetables:

Onions
Leeks
Brussell Sprouts
Beets
Carrots
Acorn Squash
Butternut Squash
Broccoli
Potatoes 
Garlic 
Lettuce
Chard
Swiss Chard
Kale
Cabbage

 

Also Available:

  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 9/15/2014 3:46pm by Eleanor Kane.

Theo and I looked at the other day and were obviously both thinking the same thing: Why does it feel like June around here??  Sure, in a lot of ways it doesn’t, since it’s suddenly freezing cold and we’re trying to find our warm socks, and there’s no bugs buzzing around our heads while we work, and it’s getting dark so early in the evening that working late into the night is proving to be a problem unless we’re going to get out flashlights.  The other morning we woke up early for harvest and I found myself turning on a lamp so that I could see to make coffee and that was a stark reminder that summer really has turned the corner to fall.  

But as much as it’s not June, the middle of September holds a lot of the same frenetic pace.  We have the mirror image of the push to get everything seeded after the last frost of the season, which is a race to get everything harvested before we lose crops to the cold.  Some things will get better after a frost or two, like the brussel sprouts and cabbages and kale, but other things we’ll be waving a fond goodbye to, such as the tomatoes and peppers.  It’s such a bittersweet time on the farm, since the tail end of season carries such satisfaction with it, but like I said last week, I’m still a bit sad to see summer go and with it, so much fresh food.  The good news is that pretty much everything that needs to be harvested is harvested, and our attic, greenhouse, and back of the farm store are each brimming with storage crops.  Onions drying, beans waiting to be shelled, pumpkins curing, and potatoes sitting in loose dirt in crates is a happy sight after a summer spent tending them in the fields, and the advent of delicious fall food tempers the farewell we’re starting to bid to the height of the summer vegetable bounty.  

In anticipation of the cooler weather we have coming up, as well as the fact that tomato season has largely passed us by, we are offering pick your own tomatoes on Wednesday and Saturday.  If you want a large quantity of tomatoes, either green or red, to put up for the winter, now’s your chance.  They’ll mostly be seconds as we’ll still harvest some of the nicer looking ones for the store, but there’s plenty out there that will be great to take home.  The price is $2.00/lb for under 20 lbs, and $1.50/lb over 20 lbs.  Please stop by the farm store before heading out into the field so that we can check in with you and just so you know ahead of time, it’s pretty weedy out there! 

This Weeks' Vegetables:

Onions
Brussell Sprouts
Beets
Carrots
Winter Squash
Broccoli
Potatoes 
Garlic 
Hot Peppers
Lettuce
Chard
Green Peppers
Red Peppers
Purple Peppers
Swiss Chard
Kale
Cabbage
Husk Cherries  

 

Other Available Products

  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 9/9/2014 6:47am by Eleanor Kane.

There was something about watching those storms roll through on Saturday evening that was like watching the end of summer.   Last week was so hot and muggy that it felt like it might as well have been the height of July or August.  Corn was coming in and a handful of eggplants had joined the peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic, beans, and watermelons that seem to be the hallmarks of warm weather.  And then, in the space of a few dark clouds and peals of thunder, that heat of summer was behind us.
 
Not, of course, that September weather isn’t wonderful in it’s own right.  Farming in the early fall seems to make the rest of the year worth it: shoveling snow in the winter, slogging through mud and bugs in the spring, and endless days of heat in summer when you feel like you can’t breathe are tempered by clear, sunny days in the 70s with low humidity and that crisp, fresh feeling in the air that makes outdoor work a sheer joy. 
 
But even as much as I love this time of year, I’m a bit sad to see summer leave us.  It means that the end of our first season is approaching and while we still have weeks and weeks left of our CSA, and even though we have tons of food still coming in from the fields, and despite the fact that it barely seems like the work has eased, it feels as though the mark that 2014 is going to make on the growing season has been made.  It’ll be remembered as the year with the cold, wet spring and the mild summer, the year that we had plenty of rain but not too much, and the year that it was achingly hot in June and yet July and August were nothing but pleasant.
 
Who knows what’ll happen in the next few weeks.  Early frost?  Maybe.  We’re in for some cold nights coming up soon.  Hurricane?  Could be.  Damaging storms, snow that comes too soon, or maybe we’ll be lucky and get a long mild fall that eases into a winter that comes right on time.  It’s hard to say, but no matter what, at this point the food is grown and we’re starting to wrap up for the year. 
 
‘Wrapping up’, of course, means we’re busy as ever transplanting fall and winter lettuce into the greenhouse, getting the Christmas trees pruned and mowed, and bringing in winter squash and pumpkins to cure before they go on sale in a week or two.  It also means planning for next year.  Theo and I went out last night and stood in the yard, wishing for sweatshirts instead of our t-shirts and socks instead of our sandals as we decided where our boar was going to spend the winter and what our breeding schedule for 2015 would look like.  Our fields still need to be tilled in for the fall, the garlic needs to get planted for next summer, and we need to decide what last minute work we’re going to get done this fall before the snow flies. 

So even though the leaves are still mostly green and the sun is still strong enough that I need a water bottle when I’m out in the fields, summer rolled right on through in a line of thunderstorms and this cooler weather reminds us that it’s time to look forward: to fall, to winter, and onwards to 2015.

 

This Week's Vegetables


Summer Squash 
Onions
Potatoes 
Garlic 
Snap Peas 
Hot Peppers
Tomatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Lettuce
Chard
Green Beans
Wax Beans
Green Peppers
Red Peppers
Purple Peppers
Swiss Chard
Kale
Cabbage
Husk Cherries

 

Other Available Products

  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 9/2/2014 8:44am by Eleanor Kane.

We hope everyone had a lovely labor day! We have a tradition we do every time there’s a Monday holiday: forget that it’s happening and then end up confused when the bank is closed and the mail doesn’t come.  Around the farm, though, the animals celebrated in style.  The goats, sheep and llama staged an early morning jail break and when we went out to move them to fresh pasture and fill up their water, they were doing sprints back and forth, celebrating their freedom.  They watched us with mouths full of grass and clover while we dragged their fences around, cleaned and moved their water bucket, and re-set up the solar energizer that provides electricity for their fence.  The good news was that by the time we were done, they were fairly easy to chase back in.  The pigs got to snack on some melons that were overripe and let me tell you, there’s nothing like watching a 600 pound sow crush a whole watermelon in her mouth in one bite, juice and seeds and rind flying everywhere. There’s also nothing quite like spraying down two ecstatic pigs on a hot afternoon, so Theo and I took a long break to do just that.  What else happened around here yesterday?  Like clockwork, our buck Nelson informed us that his breakfast, and then his dinner were both late.  They weren’t, of course, but he’s completely convinced he can hurry up the feeding process by emulating that ‘goats screaming like humans’ youtube video. Theo fixed both the big pigs and the piglets waterers and we both took a turn mowing weeds out in the pasture. I harvested onions for a couple hours and got them strung up in the attic and spread grass seed behind the chicken tractors, so that hopefully we’ll be able to continue to beat back land that still thinks it’s forest floor and convince it to be a rolling, picturesque field next summer.  We wrapped up the day with a dinner that was completely from the farm: greens, caramelized onions, garlic mashed potatoes and a ham steak.  All in all, a pretty good day!

 

This Week's Vegetables


Summer Squash 
Onions
Potatoes 
Garlic 
Snap Peas 
Hot Peppers
Tomatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Lettuce
Chard
Green Beans
Wax Beans
Green Peppers
Red Peppers
Purple Peppers
Swiss Chard
Kale
Cabbage
Husk Cherries - what are these wacky little things we have set out in pint containers?  They're a tiny little fruit in the tomato family that tastes like a very sweet grape.  

 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Methods of payment

We accept credit cards, local checks, and cash.